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The Venetian Arsenal's main gate, the Porta Magna, was built around 1460 and was the first Classical revival structure built in Venice. It was perhaps built by Antonio Gambello from a design by Jacopo Bellini. Two lions taken from Greece situated beside it were added in 1687. One of the lions, known as the Piraeus Lion, is notable for the runic defacements carved in it by invading Scandinavian mercenaries during the eleventh century. .The Venetian Arsenal, established on 1104, became the largest industrial complex in Europe prior to the Industrial Revolution, spanning an area of about 45 hectars, or about fifteen percent of Venice. At the peak of its efficiency in the early sixteenth century, the Arsenal employed some 16,000 people who were able to produce nearly one ship each day, and could fit out, arm, and provision a newly-built galley with standardized parts on a production-line basis not seen again until the Industrial Revolution.
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This image copyright Paolo De Faveri 2012. All rights reserved.
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Venice in Winter Landscape Photography
The Venetian Arsenal's main gate, the Porta Magna, was built around 1460 and was the first Classical revival structure built in Venice. It was perhaps built by Antonio Gambello from a design by Jacopo Bellini. Two lions taken from Greece situated beside it were added in 1687. One of the lions, known as the Piraeus Lion, is notable for the runic defacements carved in it by invading Scandinavian mercenaries during the eleventh century. .The Venetian Arsenal, established on 1104, became the largest industrial complex in Europe prior to the Industrial Revolution, spanning an area of about 45 hectars, or about fifteen percent of Venice. At the peak of its efficiency in the early sixteenth century, the Arsenal employed some 16,000 people who  were able to produce nearly one ship each day, and could fit out, arm, and provision a newly-built galley with standardized parts on a production-line basis not seen again until the Industrial Revolution.