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PDF_PAN105_Piazza_Pio_II_Pienza_Centre_2_Tuscany_Italy.jpg

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Piazza Pio II (Pius II Square) is the key point of the beautiful renaissance town of Pienza in Tuscany, Italy, declared world heritage site in 1996 by Unesco. Pienza was rebuilt from a village called Corsignano, which was the birthplace (in 1405) of Enea Silvio Piccolomini, a Renaissance humanist who later became Pope Pius II. Once he became Pope, Piccolomini had the entire village rebuilt as an ideal Renaissance town. Intended as a retreat from Rome, it represents the first application of humanist urban planning concepts, creating an impetus for planning that was adopted in other Italian towns and cities and eventually spread to other European centers. All the most important building of the town have their facade on the square. From left to right: Palazzo Vescovile, the Bishop's Palace: the Duomo (Cathedral); Palazzo Piccolomini, Pius II's own residence; and finally, on the far right, the colonnade of Palazzo Comunale, the Town Hall. Taken on a cold, foggy morning at the beginning of May, this is stitched from seven vertical frames.
Copyright
This image copyright Paolo De Faveri 2012. All rights reserved.
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9646x4823 / 8.8MB
Contained in galleries
Tuscany Hills in Orcia Valley
Piazza Pio II (Pius II Square) is the key point of the beautiful renaissance town of Pienza in Tuscany, Italy, declared world heritage site in 1996 by Unesco. Pienza was rebuilt from a village called Corsignano, which was the birthplace (in 1405) of Enea Silvio Piccolomini, a Renaissance humanist who later became Pope Pius II. Once he became Pope, Piccolomini had the entire village rebuilt as an ideal Renaissance town. Intended as a retreat from Rome, it represents the first application of humanist urban planning concepts, creating an impetus for planning that was adopted in other Italian towns and cities and eventually spread to other European centers. All the most important building of the town have their facade on the square. From left to right: Palazzo Vescovile, the Bishop's Palace:  the Duomo (Cathedral); Palazzo Piccolomini, Pius II's own residence; and finally, on the far right, the colonnade of Palazzo Comunale, the Town Hall. Taken on a cold, foggy morning at the beginning of May, this is stitched from seven vertical frames.